Monday, June 16, 2014

manually deploying openstack with a virtual maas on ubuntu trusty (part 2)

In the previous post, I went over how to setup a virtual MAAS environment using KVM [1]. Here I will explain how to setup Juju for use with this environment.

For this setup, we’ll use the maas-server as the juju client to interact with the cluster.

This guide was very useful:

Update to the latest stable tools:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:juju/stable
sudo apt-get update
Next we want to setup juju on the host machine.
sudo apt-get install juju-core
Create juju environment file.
juju init
Generate a specific MAAS API key by using the following link:

write the following to ~/.juju/environments.yaml replacing ‘maas api key’ with what was generated above:
default: vmaas
    type: maas
    maas-server: ''
    maas-oauth: '<maas api key>'
    admin-secret: ubuntu # or something generated with uuid
    default-series: trusty
Now let’s sync tools and bootstrap a node. Note, if you have multiple juju environments then you may need to specify ‘-e vmaas’ if it isn’t your default environment.
juju sync-tools
juju bootstrap # add --show-log --debug  for more output
See if it works by using the following command:
juju status
You should see something similar to the following:
~$ juju status
environment: vmaas
    agent-state: down
    agent-state-info: (started)
    agent-version: 1.18.4
    dns-name: maas-node-0.maas
    instance-id: /MAAS/api/1.0/nodes/node-e41b0c34-e1cb-11e3-98c6-5254001aae69/
    series: trusty
services: {}
Now we can do a test deployment with the juju-gui to our bootstrap node.
juju deploy juju-gui
While it is deploying you can type the following to get a log.
juju debug-log
I wanted to be able to access the juju-gui from an ‘external’ address, so I edited /etc/networking/interfaces on that machine to have a static address:
juju ssh 0
sudo vim /etc/networking/interfaces
Add the following to the file:
auto eth0
iface eth0 inet static
Bring that interface up.
sudo ifup eth0
The password can be found here on the host machine:
grep pass .juju/environments/vmaas.jenv
If you used the above configurations it should be ‘ubuntu’.

Log into the service so you can monitor the status graphically during the deployment.

If you get errors saying that servers couldn’t be reached you may have DNS configuration or proxy issues. You’ll have to first resolve these before using Juju. I’ve had is intermittent network issues in my lab. In order to workaround those physical issues you may have to retry the bootstrap, or increase the timeout values in ~/.juju/environments.yaml to use the following:
  bootstrap-retry-delay: 5
  bootstrap-timeout: 1200
Now you’re cooking with juju.


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  2. Great Article… I love to read your articles because your writing style is too good, its is very very helpful for all of us and I never get bored while reading your article because, they are becomes a more and more interesting from the starting lines until the end.

    kvm hypervisor openstack